Aren't the animals already dead when we buy them?

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Partmann
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Aren't the animals already dead when we buy them?

Postby Partmann » Jan 26, 2007 12:58 am

Aren't the animals already dead when we purchase meat in a grocery store?

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BeeTooman
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Postby BeeTooman » Jan 26, 2007 1:01 am

Yes, the animals are already dead when we purchase meat in a grocery store. However, this is only because we are, in effect, hiring someone to kill them for us.

The number of animals which are bred and slaughtered depends directly on the consumer demand for meat. Every time we refrain from purchasing meat in a grocery store, we reduce this consumer demand, and ensure that fewer animals will be bred and forced to suffer.

So, although the animals we are eating are already dead when we purchase meat in a grocery store, doing so directly increases the number of animals which will have to suffer and die in the future.

Quote by Eugene Khutoryansky

MomoPeach
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Postby MomoPeach » Jan 27, 2007 12:54 am

Not buying meat dosn't bring them back to life. It just (in your mind) makes you look heroic and superior cause you don't buy it.

BigBecka
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Postby BigBecka » Jan 27, 2007 8:43 pm

That's a great idea for a story: SUPERVEGAN :lol: :lol: :lol:

We've already got farmers in the UK changing to alternative crops, because beef and dairy farming isn't as high demand as it used to be.

MomoPeach
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Postby MomoPeach » Jan 29, 2007 12:11 am

We've already got farmers in the UK changing to alternative crops


Just because a couple of dumb farmers make a stupid decision doesn't mean you've changed the way people think forever. People are NEVER going to just quit eating meat for no reason. Some nerdy, loserish people stopped eating meat so, like 4 farmers stopped producing it. The majority of people eat meat, so I'd like to see you try to sit in a food store and wait for the meat to disappear off the shelves. Don't hold your breath.

lunarflowermaiden
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Postby lunarflowermaiden » Jan 29, 2007 12:36 am

BigBecka wrote:That's a great idea for a story: SUPERVEGAN :lol: :lol: :lol:

We've already got farmers in the UK changing to alternative crops, because beef and dairy farming isn't as high demand as it used to be.


That sounds like great news, BigBecka. You can see slow but definite changes where I am from, as well. For example, my town was largely known for...well...fried and greasy food-eaters. Not too long ago, being vegetarian was unheard of here. Now, you can go to the store and see a huge section of vegetarian and vegan food and even animal-free products. It makes a person feel good to know that we're being heard, even if vegetarians and vegans are still the minority.

BigBecka
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Postby BigBecka » Jan 31, 2007 8:38 pm

People are NEVER going to just quit eating meat for no reason

I'm going to get RSI if I have to post reasons for going vegan again! :lol:

So, we're all "nerdy and loserish" now? :lol:

It's good business sense for a farmer to spot a gap in the market and produce goods to fill it, instead of overproducing goods with a decreasing market value. I don't have statistics, but I'm pretty sure it's a few more than "like, four" farms who have changed how they farm. I guess time will tell. And it goes without saying that any social change takes time.

It's good to hear vegetarianism is permeating the states too! On a recent business trip, some of my colleagues were put in a motel that literally served steak for breakfast! Mind you, there's always a few places like that anywhere. In the north-east, most people don't know what a vegan is, and can be deeply unhappy with the concept of not having all food swimming in saturated fat!

WarChild
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Postby WarChild » Feb 1, 2007 8:36 am

BigBecka wrote:I'm going to get RSI


What's RSI?

BigBecka
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Postby BigBecka » Feb 1, 2007 10:32 am

Sorry: Repetitive Strain Injury :D You can get it from too much typing, amoung other things.

MomoPeach
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Postby MomoPeach » Feb 3, 2007 9:47 pm

Just because a food is not green, leafy, and tasteless doesn't mean it's "swimming in saturated fat".

BigBecka
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Postby BigBecka » Feb 4, 2007 4:42 pm

I'm not saying it is: I'm saying that's how people in the north-east (of england) tend to eat: I'm talking about the home of the deep-fried mars bar. In lard!

Recently there was a healthy eating initiative in UK schools (spearheaded by Jamie Oliver - I don't know if you heard of it). Mothers in Rotherham were buying burgers and chips from a local chippy called "Tubbies" and passing them through the school railings, because they didn't want their children eating "healthy rubbish!" :o :lol:

meign
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Re: Aren't the animals already dead when we buy them?

Postby meign » Sep 27, 2010 5:20 am

Partmann wrote:Aren't the animals already dead when we purchase meat in a grocery store?


yes they are, but have it comes in your mind what have they suffered before they are displayed at grocery stores?

Dacite
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Re: Aren't the animals already dead when we buy them?

Postby Dacite » Apr 8, 2011 6:33 pm

Yes, and people who buy the meet contribute and support that they are dead...


 


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